Google Piracy (Beta)

9 comments

Recently John Battelle spoke at Google NYC. His speech isn't the only free thing out on Google video though!

It turns out Google has also been busy giving away many new Indian films:

Hindi films like "Bunty Aur Babli", "Paheli", "Neal 'N' Nikki", "Ek Khilari Ek Hasina" are all on [Google Video]

What happens when Google is questioned about the content? Nothing. Google ignores the feedback:

IANS went to the Google website and viewed some of these freely available videos that included movies like "Neal 'N' Nikki" and "Swades", all fairly recent releases. IANS contacted Google by phone as well e-mail but did not receive any response.

It looks like Google lowered the bar on piracy:

Right now you can download Bollywood films through file sharing networks, subscription websites and Internet Relay Chat (IRC). The latest films are available soon after they are released.

"But all this requires technical skills and this is hard to do," Wadhwa said. "What Google has done is to make this whole process much easier - so that anyone who can use Google can simply search for films or music videos and click to watch them."

Comments

Okay, but try to find a

Okay, but try to find a decent pr0n movie then - that's not easy.

(Someone told somebody else in a bus - I just passed by and I couldn't help overhearing it. Wouldn't even think of searching for stuff like that, of course)

Related: Putting The Screws

Related: Putting The Screws To Google (How Old Media could take back its share of search's ad bounty)

Although I really can't see a large collaborative project by old media companies because everyone would feel they were not getting their fair share.

I can see both sides on this

On one hand, I definitely sympathize with the Bollywood producers.

On the other hand, though, I can also understand Google's stance. Can you imagine if Google was compelled to manage all disputes through different aggrieved parties calling them up on the phone or sending e-mail?

"I was the lighting director of that video! You don't have my permission!"
"I saw a naked breast in a video! Take down that porn!"
"That video is offense! It has bad language in it!"
"That video is a hate crime in my country!"
"The music in the background is copyrighted!"
"I appear in that video without my permission. I was taped without my knowledge."

Those are just a few of the objections I can think of off the top of my head. Can we really see it as reasonable for Google to take down any video without a formal request? Can you imagine the potential for abuse on the other side (e.g., jerks requesting the take down of videos that they just simply dislike, or perhaps as revenge against an ex, etc.?)

For this reason, I can understand Google's insistence upon a written, signed request.

If the Bollywood producers filed such a request and didn't get a timely response, then I think this is very inappropriate of Google. Google absolutely should have established the resources to process such written requests expeditiously... AND, beyond that, should respond immediately with a note of receipt and info ("We've received your takedown request. At present, we are processing all such requests within 3 business days...")

* * *

Again, I can absolutely understand the frustration of the Bollywood folks. It seems admittedly at least a bit burdensome for the responsibility of discovering and formally complaining about intellectual property infractions to be on the rights-holders. But placing the full responsibility on the distributor (Google) seems even more unfair and unrealistic, IMHO.

This is all the fault of. . .

China.

Somehow? Maybe? sure why not.
Seriously, this could be a problem for Google. Why couldn't they be sued just like a Napster or other file sharing networks for distributing copyrighted materials?

>> placing the full

>> placing the full responsibility on the distributor (Google) seems even more unfair and unrealistic

No Adam, If the record guys can sue napster then the bolywood guys can sue google too...I dont think Google would have simply ignored the issue if its from a holywood executive!.

Nope, Google Video != Napster. Not even close.

I should know... I've used both quite a bit :D.

I mean, hey, let's be honest: What percentage of the content on Napster was stuff put there with the permission of the rights holders? Do I hear 3%? 5%, tops?

And how many Napster memos and marketing messages focused pretty blatantly on downloading copyrighted works?

Let's compare that against Google Video...

Is Google Video...
- Primarily designed towards facilitating infringing uses?
- Primarily *used* in the context of copyright infringements?
- Advertised/marketed in such a way as to clearly encourage illegal use?

No, no, and no.

I'm not saying that the movie industry (Hollywood, Bollywood, whatever) isn't going to sue Google. Hey, Google's got deep pockets. And groups like the MPAA and the Book Publisher's Association and so on... all desperate dinosaurs, so they could use the extra income.

But comparing Google Video to Napster is just wrong on so many levels, IMHO.

i just did a bit of

i just did a bit of searching, and seems some clarification might help:

Neal N' Nikki -- Not on Google Video
Ek Khilari Ek Hasina -- Not on Google Video
Paheli -- Hour Long Clip (not whole movie)
Bunty Aur Babli -- 8 minute clip

and regarding this argument:

Is Google Video...
- Primarily designed towards facilitating infringing uses?
- Primarily *used* in the context of copyright infringements?
- Advertised/marketed in such a way as to clearly encourage illegal use?

No, no, and no.

I agree 100%, although in the recent Grokster case it did not hold up.

Grokster

As I recall, though, didn't Grokster at least meet the 2nd prong of the 'test' above? e.g., wasn't 95% or more of the stuff on there copyrighted Britney Spears 'n' similar crap?

oh yeah, you're right adam.

oh yeah, you're right adam. well, i guess if you found the grokster verdict to be problematic, than the indictment that google video is a copyright violator is even more questionable.

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