Killer Convicted based on search history

10 comments

This is the most disturbing search trend I have come across yet. At trial, the prosecution produced the accused's Google search history, showing he researched lake bottom topography plus gruesome "body decomposition" terms just days prior to his wife's disappearance. Yes, they found her in the lake. the jury took just 2 hours to convict.

In a perfect world, isn't this a great advance for society? quoted from the article:

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"...What you Google for defines you."
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"...Your search logs are the closest thing to a printout of your brain that we have."
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Moreover, it shows how police and prosecutors now are routinely making a supsect's search terms a witness for the prosecution.
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"...a listing of all the search terms someone uses is a unique, and wide-open, window into their political and religious beliefs, daily activities, investments, and identity, more so than an e-mail or a Web page they might have downloaded."

Now, did you click that link up top? How do you feel now?

via Robert Ambrogi's LawSites

Comments

How do you feel now?

I feel fine.
But then, I don't allow google to track me either.

Big brother indeed

Big brother is definitely casting his beady eye into the lives of ordinary people. With the US Patriot Act also allowing for the FBI to grab armfuls of library records, it seems private life is no longer private.

Yeah, well

Aaron's on the hook for the referrer. And he's already a known slanderer :).

a known slanderer guilty

a known slanderer

guilty till proven innocent, eh?

libel and slander are SO different BTW ;)

how long

It was a convenient test case... the guy reportedly searched for a map of the currents and bottom topology of the nearby lake, where the victim was later found, just days before her disappearance. Seemed reasonable to the jury (and public?)

Now how about if he had searched a few weeks before? Months? Maybe last year? He was already a suspect they were investigating. How about reversing the process... somebody dies of chemical poisoning August 1, why not look up everybody in the vicinity who searched for info on that chemical prior...and check them out?

That's the line to discuss... if a detective knocks on your door and says she's investigating a local murder, and wants to ask you a few questions about your recent purchase of Chemical X at the local hardware store, how do you feel? I bet you assume she's been doing research, and followed your credit card from that weed killer purchase.

But what if you had paid cash? Well, I suppose you'd suspect Bob down at the hardware store told her about your recent dandelion problems.

But what if she simply said she wanting to ask you a few questions about your recent Google searches on the biochemistry of RoundUp? [b]Freaky? or is it just good detective work?

lots0

lots0: do you cloak your Google use behind proxy? Every time? Rotated proxies? Onion skin routed? Do you own all of the servers or know their sysadmins personally? or are you just sayng you block Google cookies...mwuahahahahaha

I always delete the porn

I always delete the porn before the wife gets to the computer. I am waiting to get "convicted" on that one but until now I been too sly ;)

Max

>>>>always delete the porn before the wife gets to the computer

That's because you are normally in the p0rn.

Do No Evil

The only way for Google to live up to that credo would be to make real-time search data available to law enforcement so they could stop premeditated crime before it happens.

They will, but AttentionTrust.org will fly and we'll all join, thwarting govt attempts to track us.

-Shorebreak

Sorry Aaron :)

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guilty till proven innocent, eh?

libel and slander are SO different BTW ;)

Thankfully I haven't had to learn the differences - and I'm sorry that you had to learn it the hard way.

Speaking of which, might be time for a thread on your progess with that bit of nasty you've been dealing with?

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